Name Christopher Braginetz
Riding Richmond Hill
Interests Pretty much everything
Connect Twitter Google Plus LinkedIn

Recent posts

  • #leadership Leadership is about trusting the people around you and letting them do their job without interference, unless they go off the rails.

    Having everything but money bills being free votes would help to restore the connection between citizens and their representatives in parliament as well as democracy in general.

    Vote
      1  
    • For a democracy to work there has to be a course of action decided upon and then everybody has to accept that course of action and move forward. I don’t see how having free votes is going to help the process.
      IMV you elect an MP to represent the interests of the people of the riding. It is her job to participate in government decision making…[Read more]

      Vote
        0  
    • I think Bill Moses’s comments are bang on.

      There are times when a referendum may be appropriate, but to have everyone to vote on each and every decision would bring this country to a grinding halt. That’s why we elect our representatives to speak on our behalf or in some cases to contradict an individuals views in favor of the prevailing view.…[Read more]

      Vote
        0  
    • When a person chooses to run for office under the banner of a political party, they must accept the will of that party and be prepared to vote accordingly. And when we vote to elect someone to office under a political banner, we too must accept the will of that party.

      I invest money in, and lend my vote to, a political party based on the…[Read more]

      Vote
        -2  
      • Right on, Martin. Look at what lack of discipline is doing to U.S. democracy. Individual legislators are either selling their votes to government (via ”earmarks”) or being paid for them by donors, and not because they wish to, in all cases, but rather because it is necessary and/or expedient.

        Vote
          0  
    • I have read your comment and those that followed and it is a thorny issue. Those who replied to your comment refer to the will of the party, and somehow you are also implying the same thing is a different context. I think the real issue then must be that all the mps should be consulted in an in party vote, and then when the vote is counted the in…[Read more]

      Vote
        2  
  • #cannabis The war on drugs is an abject failure. It’s been going on since the 1960’s with no tangible results, other than creating enormously powerful drug lords. Dealing with addicts by imprisonment is the wrong approach and we don’t really need to worry about the casual users.

    Legalising cannabis and decriminalising other drugs while…[Read more]

    Vote
      10  
    • If you want to fight drug’s, the best way would be to infiltrate schools and remove as much addicts as possible. To cut their clients would be the best solution and thus, you need to remove it from high schools and from the street. By encouraging the population to react negatively to it, like they did at a certain time with prostitution buy…[Read more]

      Vote
        -6  
      • Michael: The object is to mitigate! That is to have people choose less harmful recreational fare and to put the criminals who supply dangerous recreational drugs out of business. Youngsters use illegal drugs because they are more easily available that the “legal” ones and pills are less visible than bottles. Legalizing, is controlling usage for…[Read more]

        Vote
          1  
        • Thank’s Lloyd I understand what you are trying to do and agree with you. What I wanted to say is that the Surete du Québec had tried in the past to infiltrate some schools in the past and they had a proof that it is where they make the kids drug users. That is why the government shoud encourage police forces all around the country to infiltrate…[Read more]

          Vote
            0  
          • Thanks Michael: The kids buy and are occasionally employed as mules. Trying to stop kids is what police forces have been trying to do. Doing it again will not likely change the outcome; which is why LPC want to legalize at least the major rec. drug in order to control it. Controlling booze sales does not stop all kids from drinking but it stops…[Read more]

            Vote
              0  
      • So in order to weed out one of the most harmful drugs they should infiltrate schools and take out the drinkers?

        Vote
          0  
        • What I mean by that Frank is by arresting a couple of dealers in the schools, it will have an effect on the users and it should diminish their addiction to it. At least, they would think twice before trying to buy in the school and it would force out of the schools the dealers so it would be more easy for the police pinpoint them our of the shools.

          Vote
            0  
          • Arresting dealers during the past 50 years has not worked. Supply and demand is an economic truth that says the market will create new dealers. Create a legal *regulated* market, and the black market gangsters lose their monopoly. Now you can take out a dealer, and his customers have a regulated supply to purchase. The market no longer has to…[Read more]

            Vote
              1  
    • Every time you hit them, they hit back by adding more drugs. The only way is to attack the base and remove as much clients as possible. It is the only way to win that fight.. Putting people in jail is no way to help them, they get more corrupted there than anywhere else. The correctional system is another failure and a big one two. Prisons…[Read more]

      Vote
        0  
      • You should look up the success Colorado is having with legalization. Millions earned in taxes and major crime is down 5%. Not to mention the money saved by courtrooms not being clogged with ridiculous marijuana charges.

        Vote
          3  
        • I agree with you Jeff, that it would be a step in the good direction; more money and less crime and I dont criticize over it at all. What I want to show is more a principle fact that if the government legalize a part of the drugs. They will directly fight the drugs lords and use it to increase their revenues and level down a bit the crime rate. …[Read more]

          Vote
            -1  
    • Christopher: One could add a burgeoning legal bureaucracy, gleeful beer hawkers, etc. That being the case, why does the ”dark side” feign righteous indignation at your notion and obviously that of JT? How do the ”mom & pop” merchants, and dwellers of the modest side of town benefit from any war, least of all the war on drugs. It’s clearly not a…[Read more]

      Vote
        2  
  • #PoliticalTaxCredit The current method of giving a credit of 75% on the first $400 of contributions, 50% on the next $350 and 33 1/3% of any contribution over $750 is far too generous and favours those with high incomes. Those who have little or no tax payable do not benefit at all. I would like to see the credit reduced to the same level as any…[Read more]

    Vote
      5  
    • The Ontario political tax credit is refundable even if you pay no income tax (provincial income tax of course). That is certainly a fairer system for the points you have made. What would be even better is to have payment made to the political party for each vote received by that political party. This would be fair for everyone and would…[Read more]

      Vote
        2  
    • As a retired couple who has not been able to use our tax credits for the past 6 years I agree whole heartedly.
      Yes, we will continue to donate to the liberal party and our riding association but being told over and over again that it is really only $25 and not $100 is getting on my nerves.

      Vote
        2  
  • #petitions
    Let’s forget about petitions and turn them into policy discussions. It’s not as if they’re going to make the CP change their ideology.

    Vote
      2  
    • Petitions are a useful tool in advocacy efforts. The act of signing a petition on a particular issue (on average) makes you more committed to a cause. So, this has an impact on things like how likely you are to get out and vote. This is important even with supporter groups where there is always a collective difference between intention and…[Read more]

      Vote
        5  
    • Christopher: My modest proposal, taking into account William’s response is let’s discuss policy and leave petitions to their own devices. What policy did you have in mind so I can consider my contribution, if any.

      Vote
        0  
  • #economy Small and medium businesses are traditionally the job creators. Offering a tax break to companies with fewer than 200 employes for new hires equal to the Workman’s Compensation premiums for two years would not only make economic sense, but sell well politically.

    Vote
      0  
    • As we know from experience (and, currently, Quebec via the Commission in session), the devil’s in the details with these sorts of incentive programmes, so, although I agree with the basic idea that small businesses could use a break, I have concerns.

      Vote
        3  
    • Christopher: My experiences are largely with post secondary students, counsellors and employers. Whatever small to medium businesses have a reputation for, wage subsidy programs have little, if any, credibility. The typical abuse is to sack a diligent worker rather than incorporate her/him into the company workforce, than to hire another to…[Read more]

      Vote
        3  
    • I agree with the first part of Llyod Sereda’s comment. As an employer, I never depended on grants or subsidies to employ people. My business volume determined whether or not I needed to increase the number of people working. Business volume increased, I hired more people, permanent full-time, to get the work done and they had jobs as long…[Read more]

      Vote
        2  
    • I agree with Lloyd, Municipalities are job creators and there are mountains of work on infrastructure desperately in need of funding. If we are going to spend money on job creation, that is one of the best places to do it.

      Vote
        1  
    • I’m a big believer in getting rid of tax credits, not adding more. I do think small and medium businesses need support, but I rather agree with the others that economic reality and stuff needing to be done drive employment. Where they could very well use some help is with commerical rent and/or property tax and those kinds of expenses that they…[Read more]

      Vote
        1  
  • #fundraising A smartphone app should be created not only for fund raising, but signing up members and supporters. During the leadership campaign, many slipped though the cracks as there was no simple way to enrol new members and supporters.

    Vote
      4  
  • #policy The first rule about any policies is that they sometimes don’t work. I know a politician admitting to it is tantamount as walking naked through town square, but trying to keep making bad policy work it the height of idiocy.

    Vote
      3  
    • I don’t know why it is so important for a politician not to admit to his own mistakes. I think most citizens would admire his/her courage and honesty enough to counter the barrage of attacks that might be received from opponents. There needs to be much more openness in the political arena. If all members were naked then the nakedness would not be…[Read more]

      Vote
        8  
    • I think the problem now is that there are so many errors for which to apologize! So many policies have been introduced with such fanfare, justification (often false) and bombast that it must be very difficult to admit that mistakes have been made. Because the base of support is so narrow and ideological, and because the PM is so closed to…[Read more]

      Vote
        4  
      • I agree that to support failing policy is not only ignorant but arrogant. Admit the mistake, apologize if necessary, analyze why the policy was inane or ineffective, learn from your mistakes and move on to better analysis for policy-making.

        Vote
          1  
        • Paul Martin comes to mind. He had the courage to admit something wasn’t working and was labelled ’Mr. Dithers’.

          Vote
            2  
          • The media and opposition attack ads can be a mine fieldbut honesty and authenticity is always the best response.

            Vote
              1  
          • Christopher: Mr. Harper should have known a bunch of his policies were not working but stuck to his John Wayne guns, just the same. What have people been calling him? Attack ads devastated M. Dion but ”Green Shift” has way more support than Blue Raid of the Public Purse.

            Vote
              1  
    • If policies are fully vetted before being announced they are more likely not to fail.
      Marijuana as an example is a winning issue for our party. But before we announce details, lets get it right. I have already had a PC voter tell me he is going to vote Liberal because of our legalization moves. We can’t allow the issue to become a source of…[Read more]

      Vote
        1  
      • True, we have to be careful here. I’m not sure that winning over pro-marijuana voters simply so that they can continue their habits legally is the right approach. Rather the issue should be to legalize marijuana to curtail black market profits and control its use. Education should then reveal that like smoking in general smoking marijuana has…[Read more]

        Vote
          0  
  • #supplymanagement
    This legislation was enacted over 20 years ago and if nothing else, needs an overhaul that reflects the changes between then and now.

    Vote
      1  
    • #supplymanagement
      To be precise, the Canadian Dairy Commision Act was passed in 1966 by the Canadian Government. The SMS came into effect in the 1970s. It’s almost 40 years old. Forty years brought fundamental changes to the Canadian economy for sure. Agriculture sector wasn’t an exception. Since 1971, the number of Canadian dairy farms has…[Read more]

      Vote
        -1  
      • Well, it would be interesting to see how many younger members of the families just didn’t go into farming – most in my generation didn’t. As well, back in the day, your farm might be identified as `dairy’ by the Ag Dept but, in fact, you also had other lines of income. In my experience, it has not been uncommon to see farmers move into meat…[Read more]

        Vote
          1  
    • Christopher: did you have something particular in mind in as much as boards are required to review as a matter of course. Two problems were identified by some ag econs (UA, UBC, e.g.): 1. provinces allow off board trading, resulting in the worst of all worlds, rather than the best, 2. quota prices were set in the free-for-all markets and then…[Read more]

      Vote
        1  
  • #senategate
    I don’t believe that electing senators is a good thing. We already have a surfeit of politicians, and electing senators would exclude those who can’t charm the pants off people but would make great senators.

    Setting up a non-partisan committee for the purpose of finding and vetting eminent Canadians would likely not need a…[Read more]

    Vote
      2  
    • I do like the idea of a bi-partisan committee vetting eminent Canadians to the upper chamber. It would remove the obvious partisan quagmire and really provide a sober second thought rather than rubber stamping all bills the government proposes. It would also remove from the ruling party any chance of any government in power in trying to push…[Read more]

      Vote
        2  
  • Positive beat negative this time around. Good work, Yvonne.

    Vote
      0  
  • #leadershiprace

    If you don’t get that JT is not about being in the left, centre or right but embraces good ideas and rejects bad ones from across the political spectrum, you’ll never understand him.

    Vote
      2  
    • I have gotten the impression that Mr. Justin Trudeau will take considerable risks to express his own opinion and will not easily be controlled even by highly influential people. This is a major reason why if I ended up being a delegate, (which I don’t think I will be able to do), I believe I would vote for him in spite of the fact that he has a…[Read more]

      Vote
        2  
      • No need to be a delegate to vote for the Leader of the party anymore. As far as I know, we are now a ”one member, one vote” party (technically some form of one member, one vote + one supporter, one vote that hasn’t been fully defined yet – the supporter piece, that is).

        Vote
          2  
    • Based on the fact that yesterday (back in Quebec) Mr Trudeau now says that he actually supports the LGR and would vote for it again, what idea is it that he is supporting? I can’t tell anymore.

      It sounds to me like the only idea he truly, unequivocally supports is the idea that he should get elected and that his ideas supersede the policies of…[Read more]

      Vote
        3  
      • I, for one, am willing to give the young Justin T. the benefit of the doubt for the time being. It seems fairly obvous that you (Martin) will be supporting another hopeful, but jumping to the conclusion that he will “say anything to get elected” seems a bit premature.

        How do you stand on the Long Gun Registry? Is it the registry that you are…[Read more]

        Vote
          1  
        • I don’t much like guns but am also a pragmatist. Living in rural Ontario, the dislike of government in general is a reality and anything that smacks of what is perceived as intrusion on privacy is strongly opposed.

          We all feel much the same about the legislation to spy on our email and browsing habits.

          Vote
            0  
        • What I find difficult to support is a candidate who has diametrically opposing views on the same issue depending on the group of people he is talking to.

          Vote
            1  
    • Christopher: If the epitome of Liberal is one who collects “…good ideas and rejects bad ones from across the political spectrum….” it must follow that its opponents collect bad ideas and reject good ones. This calls into question the following: What is the opposition doing in power? You seem to have accepted Liberalism as performance driven,…[Read more]

      Vote
        3  
      • I consider myself more broad minded than mired in a particular political ideology. JT and MHF seem to be doing a pretty good job, on balance in taking strong stances in what wouldn’t be ‘Liberal’ from your point of view, such as the dairy marketing board.

        Doctrine has nothing to do with it, just good and bad ideas. Heaven knows people hang on…[Read more]

        Vote
          4  
        • The point is, cutting taxes and expecting balanced budget is doctrinal and from the supporters of that doctrine “a very good idea”. The landscape is littered with such “doctrineless” and “perspectiveless” good ideas. If it’s a good idea simply answer “for whom”? The full minimum answer begins with a satisfactory response to “Who will…[Read more]

          Vote
            4  
        • Good ideas would be the ones “I agree with” and bad ideas would be the ones “I don’t agree with”.

          When enough people get together that have a similar view of what is “good” and what is “bad” we have a political party.

          Each member of that party can and does have views that vary from other members but collectively we support most of the…[Read more]

          Vote
            4  
          • Not quite. I didn’t agree with all of PET’s ideas – the NEP jumps to mind, but I believed he did it with the best of intentions. Trudeau Senior made plenty of mistakes, but he was arguably the best PM in our history.

            I may be way to the right fiscally, but I also believe that crime and poverty are inextricably mixed and solving one will solve…[Read more]

            Vote
              1  
            • Well, I’m really not sure what your are disagreeing with when you say “Not quite”. My point was clearly that all party members have different “good ideas” but what makes us a party is that we agree on more than we disagree.

              If you wish to vote for a leader that will tell you what those good ideas are, that is your prerogative. I will vote…[Read more]

              Vote
                3  
    • I liked what Justin had to say.
      The LGR was a failure. It was a really good idea that was not handled properly. I think this is what JT was trying to say.
      There has to be some control over who has guns in this country but you cannot make people feel they are criminals for haveing these guns.
      Personally, I think the location of the citizen (city,…[Read more]

      Vote
        2  
      • Perhaps it’s due to my having lived from East to West; in big cities and small rural towns as well as Quebec and Ontario that gives me a different perspective than many.

        The Liberal Party has been a city focused one for far too long and needs to become one that considers all parts of the country as important. Paul Martin came the closest but…[Read more]

        Vote
          1  
      • The long gun registry was a failure because it failed to consider the context of their ownership and use. There are plenty of controls on legal gun ownership in this country. Handguns have been tightly regulated for over 80 years; gun ownership and the ability to purchase ammunition is still regulated. Justin Trudeau, in his comments, was simply…[Read more]

        Vote
          2  
  • #campaign overspending
    I have a simple proposal for the penalty for exceeding spending limits during an election campaign. Reduced the vote total of the candidate by the same percentage as the amount overspent.

    Vote
      3  
    • Actually, how about reduce the vote total exponentially by the amount overspent and have a cut-off limit so that overspending by, say, 25% gets you instantly unelected and unable to run in the next election.

      Vote
        2  
  • #leadershiprace
    Some of you may remember and others may have heard of Groucho Marx’s radio program ‘You Bet Your Life’. It was a little before my time, but what I remember most was the rubber duck that would fall when a contestant said the secret word.

    I read an article about the campaign people around Justin. On talked about ideas, saying…[Read more]

    Vote
      2  
    • Claim the middle. Define the extremes!

      Vote
        2  
      • I disagree – a good idea is a good one, regardless of where it comes from.

        For example, I would increase the corporate tax rate and decrease payroll taxes by the same amount. Payroll taxes apply to Canada, and a generalised cut lets a multi-national company do what they wish with, which is often creating jobs in another country.

        Anyway, the…[Read more]

        Vote
          2  
    • I hear what you are saying Christopher and I definitely agree that there are good ideas to be found in any party, left, right, green, middle … none of us has all the answers.

      But I caution against “cherry-picking” ideas and policy. We need Liberal ideas and a Liberal platform. That is not to say that we can’t “borrow” some initiatives, but…[Read more]

      Vote
        1  
  • #privacy
    Our current laws seem to give political parties unbridled rights to our privacy, our party included.

    We should be allowed to opt in to voluntarily disclosing personal information, not the other way around.

    Vote
      -2  
  • #renewal
    The Liberal party is an old one and as such still has some ’buggy whips’ in the system. Renewal is also about throwing out any and all old baggage and starting over.

    The Conservatives did it when they were reborn and have the most up to date systems in place for fundraising and identifying their voters.

    Vote
      0  
  • #website
    It pains me to say that many RAs don’t have any web presence at all; not even the generic subdomain provided via Liberal University.

    If we as a party are going to go anywhere but down, there needs to be a fire lit under some behinds in those ridings without MPs.

    Vote
      4  
    • It’s the wrong place to get it, but I went to Elections Canada and got about as far as ‘C’ in Ontario. About 1/3 had nothing at all, another third had generic templates with no real riding information and of the remaining third, half were generics with some RA information and the rest had their own domains and were well maintained.

      Rather a…[Read more]

      Vote
        3  
    • Your RA president should be able to get you access to Liberalist if you want to be a volunteer. I’m in the SD&SG riding and am assisting in getting the website updated and relevant.

      I have access to Liberalist now and am getting my head around finding current and past volunteers that are desperately needed to help rebuild a Liberal presence in…[Read more]

      Vote
        2  
    • We’re always looking for volunteers to help our in their ridings with websites! use http://liberal.ca/riding to find your riding and contact your riding president to get in touch and offer your support directly to them!

      Vote
        2  
    • You can request a website from Liberal University. It will be a subdomain of liberal.ca (www.yourriding.liberal.ca) an is in WordPress, relatively simple way to create pages, posts and comments.

      Vote
        1  
    • Agreed, it has been quite difficult to find some official Liberal presence in many ridings.

      Vote
        2  
  • #environment-pipelines
    It’s probably not an original thought, but since supertankers are required to be double hulled, why shouldn’t pipelines be required to be the same? A spill would leak into the outer pipeline which would have monitors to detect the weight of the spilled oil.

    It’s not as if the oil companies can’t afford it.

    Vote
      4  
    • Interesting thought. Maybe because they never thought of it, or maybe after it did leak, after shutting it down, they would then have to cut into the outer hall to get to the leaking inner hall, patch it up, then try to clean up the oil that leaked for miles between the two pipes, which would be impossible to clean up, then patch up the outer hall.

      Vote
        -1  
      • I expect there is a solution for that as well, possibly valves in strategic locations.

        I’m curious as to how it’s done on a supertanker, which is far more problematic as the spilled oil in the outer hull would have to be evenly distributed somehow or else the weight shift would cause serious balance issues.

        Single pipes aren’t the answer,…[Read more]

        Vote
          0  
  • #vision
    Here’s one – committed to reducing the gap between the rich and the disadvantaged, not to mention the middle class. I’d call it the ’Just Society’, but someone beat me to it ;).

    Vote
      5  
  • #leadershiprace
    I just read that Bob is not going to run. Much as I like him personally and would trust him to babysit my kids if they were still young, a new face is needed if the party is going to make a real noise in the next election.

    Vote
      6  
    • I also want to add my thanks to Bob for the great job he has done as interim leader and for doing the honourable thing by keeping his word. Bob, I thank you and hope you stay on in a senior capacity.

      Vote
        5  
    • I think Bob is doing exactly what I thought he would. Keep the attacks on himself as long as possible to let the other possible candidates get more experience in the house. Now, Dominic LeBlanc please step forward and announce your intentions.

      Vote
        3  
  • #merger
    After much soul searching, I have concluded that the three parties on the left need to merge and become something different than the old way of doing things.

    It would be neither NDP or Liberal dominated. Just something new that is in tune with the new connected world ins which we live.

    Vote
      -1  
    • Just a quick note to point out that some members might disagree that the LPC is a Party on the left – I leave that up for discussion. Also worth pointing out that according to Bob Rae the NDP currently wants nothing to do with a merger.

      Vote
        1  
    • I am 100% against a merger with the NDP. I do, however support Nathan Cullen’s idea, if the Liberals & NDP are both around 30% in 2014, with the Cons at 40%.

      Naturally, if the Liberals or NDP were 70% in the polls, neither party would be interested. (Polls are just polls, and are just a small sample size of the population.)

      While the Liberal…[Read more]

      Vote
        0  
    • This “merger” talk seems to rear its ugly head every month or so … and it always tends to lead to another discussion … so here I go again …

      I do not support a merger of political parties in Canada. The last thing we want to do in Canada is stray down the path of a 2-party system. Just look south and tell me if you think it works. US Congress…[Read more]

      Vote
        3  
      • I don’t think a merger is desirable either. Listen to Jean Chretien – who benefited by a split of the Right vote for years and he will tell you a new party is what’s needed, formed from the LPC and NDP party with a new vision.

        Wallpapering over the cracks in the LPC, which seems to be happening now is not going to work.

        Vote
          1  
      • I really think this is a sensible idea. The parties on the left and the centrist LPC are simply too different to merge – unless it comes to the point that the LPC is simply too weak to carry on,and the ndp too strong, then we might have to throw our hand in. Personally i agree with you, i hope that day never arrives and we are faced with two…[Read more]

        Vote
          2  
    • I think it needs to be said again that the Liberal party is a Centrist party. We draw on both the left and the right. Fiscal conservatism, Progressive social policies, and a strong sense of environmentalism. We ar the best parts of the Conservatives, the NDP and the Greens.

      Vote
        2  
      • Right. Which is exactly why we need to Cooperate ahead of the next election–not merge, not create a new “left” party of all of us. Because if we would only cooperate and run one candidate this time, we can all go back to being who we really are–and there ARE differences–once we bring in the needed electoral reform so that this doesn’t have…[Read more]

        Vote
          1  
    • That’s pretty much what Cretien said when interviewed a while back, Merger with no baggage from wither party.

      It may be more of a dream than electoral reform, but the latter will never happen before the former.

      Vote
        0  
    • It seems a bad idea to merge into a 2 party system, as Harper wants by the way. Even the conservative party would be called a leftist party by American standards. Of course a few more years in Harper power and that may not be true. Is that what we want?

      Vote
        1  
      • You’ve hit on exactly why I don’t like the merger idea at all. 1) A two-party system is desirable only for the controlling elites, and 2) Harper wants a 2 party system. On point #1, if there are only two parties, effectively it’s easier for powerful interests to effectively “buy” all the leadership candidates in either party. The more…[Read more]

        Vote
          1  
  • Load More