Name David Momotiuk
Riding Spadina-Fort York
Interests 2.86%
Web site Nexyear.com

My story

Sole Proprietor and entrepreneur, David Momotiuk, has taken on the work of creating jobs. While having an expertise in history and economics, he has become a leading edge thinker and innovator. Using complex algorithms, meditative reasoning, hard work and physical labour, he has created a digital product that preserves and expands knowledge. Using his approach, individuals and businesses can expand economic opportunity while enhancing the intent of writings, actions and thoughts. He can be reached by email at broker25@nexyear.com or by phone and text at 226-347-4753.

Recent posts

  • #Why-it-happened

    Here’s a theory. The use of a ‘pressure cooker bomb’ in the Boston Marathon Massacre may very well be a symbolic desperate attempt to communicate the disagreement with the Law enforcement, tactic of ‘pressure cooker policing’ also referred to as ‘fish bowl policing’.

    Verbal communications and conversations that sincerely…[Read more]

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  • Radio news and CTV reports… Justice is about to begin. Suspect caught and captured after the Boston Marathon Massacre. Heat sensors found him, character saved him.

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  • Here below is what the PM, SH said regarding the Boston Marathon Massacre conducted on so-called Patriot’s Day, and below that, is my more wide-ranging and detailed critique of his reported ‘statement to the press’

    ———

    “The one thing I would say is this…
    Uuuhhhmmmm… Pause. Pause. Pause.
    When you see this type of action…
    Uuuhhh, when you…[Read more]

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  • The Conservative #attackads are so immature. Taking things out of context and distorting words like that is ok for comedians, I suppose, but it is not what I want from politicians who are supposed to be leaders, not bullies.

    Canadians deserve a more responsible discussion about the different issues facing our country.

    And some of those important…[Read more]

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  • Gregory, you bring up some good points.

    And now that you mention it, I also noticed that and agree with your frustration about it. It seems the reason it is that way is the ‘50% plus one format’ of the […]

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  • #Observation:

    JM seemed to gathered 81.91% more voters than financial donors, while JT had 89.5563283% more voters than financial donors. Trudeau won that type of ‘margin of victory’ by a difference of about 7.6463283%.

    And if you consider a ‘points per donor’ ‘ratio differential analysis’, JM seemed to gather 930 more points than number of…[Read more]

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  • #Liberal-Progressives

    Turns out… Fair Vote Canada has only had ONE resignation regarding the email-list usage. The rest are standing firm.

    Previous reports suggested there were some 6 or 7 people doing something wrong or seemingly so. My understanding is that they were mostly, even simply, supporting one of their main causes. That is……[Read more]

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  • #Liberal-Progressives

    On this holiday Monday, I found myself surfing twitter and ran into – MP, Megan Leslie’s tweet to Mike McDaniel — @MikeMcD76, which then lead me to read this article from PEJ News at http://www.PEJ.org

    I thought… here’s some news Liberals should know about. ;…[Read more]

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  • #Liberal-Progressives are not with Trudeau, we’re goin’ with Murray! : )

    Digitally, socially, circumstantially, environmentally, economically, fiscally, demonstrably, intuitively, responsibly, resoundingly with Joyce Murray.

    Joyce Murray represents a more representative democracy.

    She’ll bring about a one Act parliament to install PR…[Read more]

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    • Joyce Murray represents a complete absence of knowledge about how Canadian Democracy works. That so many Canadians share her ignorance is to me the fault of the Press by not educating people on the reality of our system. PR violates the CHARTER and the basic premise behind Representative Democracy.

      Joyce murray does not understand the distinct…[Read more]

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  • #Liberal-Progressives

    Joyce Murray realized that Canadians were paying Japanese ‘carbon-tariffs’ in the amount of almost a half-billion dollars when she was Minister of Water, Land and Air Protection (Environment and Parks), 2001-2004, and serving as Minister of Management Services 2004-2005, for the province of British Columbia.

    Her plan…[Read more]

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    • We should also take this issue to the WTO.

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      • Joyce Murray’s plan would be to implement a carbon-tax here so that those tariffs wouldn’t be levied in the first place.

        At the same time Liberal progressives support Japan’s preference to have that tariff policy in place. It puts a check on industry. The movement is to reduce carbon emissions.

        The Conservatives have only reduced…[Read more]

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        • David,

          Contrary to your view, their are many ‘progressive’ Liberals who do not support the implementation of a carbon tax here in Canada providing a variety of alternative measures to address environmental issues at both national and international levels. And our withdrawal from the Kyoto Accord was actually one of the very rare policies in…[Read more]

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          • Try not to equate the desires and platforms of a political campaign with the obligations of the Canadian Government under international law. We’re here to improve the law. And intelligent, articulate and active citizenship is one of the best ways to influence the direction of our country.

            Your choice to not vote for Joyce Murray and her cutting…[Read more]

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          • Sorry Jonathan … an accidental ”thumbs-down” from me … meant as a thumbs-up. I agree wholeheartedly with your comment.

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            • Martin,

              Thanks. I have always believed it is extraordinary important for the Liberal Party to always work towards and hope for a better world, but to also refrain from naive proposals by guiding our actions with prudence and pragmatism. In my opinion, this is how the Liberal Party has defined itself against the extreme views of the left and…[Read more]

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              • Exactly – and ignoring the fact that most of the developed world has moved on with PR electoral reforms is a special kind of extreme views. Not left or right – just regressive.

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                • Sergiy,

                  While I too support the implementation of PR electoral reforms, this does not change the fact that many of JM’s other proposals are extremely naive. Moreover, it is wrong to depict our first past the post electoral system as regressive since this system simply represents the status quo, it is not indicative of a return to a former or…[Read more]

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                  • It might be considered status quo from Canadian perspective, but it is definitely regressive from global perspective. We are just one of the few “dinosaurs” who are still using it. And we are probably the only country which both has FPTP and essentially absolute power in single hands – our PM. Other countries with FPTP have at least some checks…[Read more]

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    • Alberta already has a carbon tax, probably Saskatchewan too

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  • #Liberal-Progressives

    Proportional Representation produces a more Representative Parliament (PRPAMRP).

    It basically improves the ongoing dialogues and debates regarding the relevant concerns of our time.

    Heck, the Social Contract we have with our fellow citizens does not recommend sidelining and/or marginalizing anyone in the global sphere…[Read more]

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    • I find the idea of cooperation interesting from the Green perspective. My understanding of JM’s cooperation plan is that we would cooperate in the ridings where the CPC won with less than 50% of the vote and that the progressive party that has the most support would field the candidate to run against the CPC.

      How many ridings are there where the…[Read more]

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      • Are you seriously questioning Joyce Murray’s innate ability to *predict the future voting intentions of all Canadians? (*sarcasm ; )

        Obviously each election is different then the last one. However, cooperating so as to bring about Proportional Representation is a strategy that could be palatable to many voters from all parties.

        For instance, if…[Read more]

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      • Both Elizabeth May and Joyce Murray (and before that – Nathan Cullen) put long term interests of their parties and Canada in general ahead of short term political gains. Cooperation doesn’t guarantee gains in 2015 to any specific opposition party; it simply guarantees ouster of the Harper regime, which in turn clears the way for the electoral…[Read more]

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      • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Results_by_riding_for_the_Canadian_federal_election,_2011

        I counted 58 seats where the Cons won with a minority, of which Libs placed 2nd in 35. The cooperation plan, as I understand it, goes like this: If the LPC and NDP choose to cooperate then NDP wins but the deal is they have to implement PR. If there’s no…[Read more]

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  • With all due respect, Rt. Hon Paul Martin, how can it already be ‘showtime’ when the Party has yet to release to us the official numbers of registered members and supporters?

    Or is that a detail we don’t need […]

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  • #Liberal-Progressives

    Can a ‘digital democracy’ emerge from Joyce Murray’s democratic reform movement?

    My sense is that it can. It could be quite compelling to voters to present the option of choosing ’alternative candidates’ in some 57 some ridings.

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  • #Liberal-Progressives

    Can a ‘digital democracy’ emerge from Joyce Murray’s democratic reform movement?

    My sense is that it can. It could be quite compelling to voters to present the option of choosing ’alternative candidates’ in some 57 some ridings.

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  • Would that be different than the ‘renewal’ agenda?

    Liberal Progressives are firm believers in ‘renewing’ the LPC. Joyce Murray’s campaign might be able to build that into the platform. Still a few weeks left […]

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  • CTVnewsBias? Well they obviously know how to edit.

    For what reason did they omit Joyce Murray’s response to JT’s temper-tantrum about not be ‘interested’ in Thomas Mulcair as a PM.

    She clearly stated that PR could or would instead mean ‘a Liberal Prime Minister’.

    Her response was calm and confident, and occurred before the microphone was…[Read more]

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  • @John-Halonen #joke #false-numbers #leadershiprace

    Twitter Inc. asserted today that they now have one billion users signed-up over the last eight years.

    *joke* Justin Trudeau’s campaign says they have signed up eight billion of those users over the last year alone. *joke*

    : )

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  • So long as unethical Corporations insist on polluting and exploiting our natural resources and while Conservatives continue to insist on describing Canada as an unskilled ignorant society, we Liberals should be forthright in promoting our more optimistic message of a knowledge-based society that is environmentally sustainable.

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  • The #trudeau-cheaters have officially been given another weeks extention to register to vote. Their incompetence is true to form as they may ultimately give us yet another decade of loser candidates and opposition platitudes.

    Their actions and results show little integrity or committment to fair play or sincerity.

    Their desire to win is…[Read more]

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    • Wow.
      The extension is because there is a problem with the liberal data system. People who have been members for years are not getting the correct info and don’t know if they are registered.
      Under these circumstances who knows how many people who signed as supporters for any of the candidates are lost in the system.
      This has nothing to do with…[Read more]

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      • Mary; do you work in LPC?
        are you suggesting that the Liberal party database of MEMBERS is so poorly managed that these people could not be contacted; by email (if provided) or by post, as proscribed by the rules? or is the case that a number of supporter names were submitted by candidates which had incomplete information and that is in fact the…[Read more]

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    • What a sad comment.

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    • Well David, you’re giving life to the phrase sore loser…even before you’ve lost.

      If MG’s figures are accurate Trudeau has it by a landslide whether or not everybody gets an extra week to sign people up. And if it is true than many of our supporters are concentrated in ON and BC ridings it isn’t as if Trudeau gets any special advantage in…[Read more]

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    • David, I understand the sentiment but can we please look at the bigger picture. So many of or young people are so turned off by the political scene that they have never voted. Someone got them signed up and we should give then an opportunity to vote. We need their support in order to get PR implemented. In fact, it is for our children and…[Read more]

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      • There you go again Patricia – that is just not true! JT is FOR electoral reform – he is a strong supporter of PV. Which is (I believe) what was endorsed at the convention by the LPC membership last year – NOT PR.

        What you mean to say is JT does not support YOUR ideal of electoral reform. Please make an effort to tell the truth – this is the…[Read more]

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        • Martin, I do not wish to debate with you. It is fruitless exercise that enlightens no-one. I think that I have made my positions clear – if not here, then elsewhere in this blog.

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          • My comment was not an attempt to draw you into debate Patricia, far from it. I won’t waste any more of my time attempting to debate with someone as apparently closed minded as you.

            You have stated quite clearly, several times, that you believe anyone who does not agree with your personal views on electoral reform has not done the research you…[Read more]

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  • #cannabis should be legalized without taxation. The personal regulation of moderation, responsibility and respect is more than enough for any negative aspects to be balanced properly.

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    • The commercial operations should certainly be taxed.
      Also commercial operations should be subject to third party regulation wherby they have to apply to be able to grow it. This would be done to ensure that a black market doesn’t continue to grow, even though it is ”legal”

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      • What if a Supply Management system were imposed on producers?

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        • The management of supply would be based upon demand alone.

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        • I think this will be the wrong approach. It is not like the product would have a short shelf life, like milk and eggs. How do we keep the quota price from inflating if the system ever changes?

          With the US possibly changing their system we could end up with similar problems like we have with supply management.

          I would think that Health Canada…[Read more]

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          • Over regulation solves nothing and creates criminals, expense and corruption. Should we tax people who eat improperly more, people who do not exercise sufficiently more, where do we draw the line, cannabis is just another plant, and like ordinary food can be used sensibly or abused, we do not need more laws, we need more freedom, but maybe with…[Read more]

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    • Two questions:

      1) Do you agree that it should be regulated? i.e. production, distribution and sale should be controlled? If so and there is no taxation the cost of an ounce of marijuana is likely to fall to the $10 an ounce range. Is that a good thing?

      2) If the people using marijuana as a recreational substance are willing to currently pay…[Read more]

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      • Abuse and self-control, i believe, has less to do with the product than with the person or the circumstance.

        Health care, education, recreation, and budget short falls already have revenue streams so they shouldn’t require yet another one.

        Production and distribution costs obviously vary, therefore i would recomend that the price should reflect…[Read more]

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        • I’m not sure you understood my point … if marijuana is not taxed the cost will drop to about $10 an ounce – that is the realistic estimate of the cost of farming and distributing marijuana.

          Do you think marijuana should be available at $10 an ounce?

          Our governments, at all levels, are operating in deficit. Why would we not take advantage of a…[Read more]

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          • I am in favour of the price reflecting the actual costs, not consequences or estimates, of production and distribution.

            $10 ?? no. $20 ?? yes.

            And to answer ur last question (hopefully : )) from my perspective, governments do not need more revenue or more work, they need integrity and reason.

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          • Martin you hit the nail on the head my friend,the revenues from Marijuana would really impact the deficits we now face federally & provincial.

            Smokes,booze etc: are taxed,even our gas is hit,Marijuana would be big revenue earner.

            I personally do not use Marijuana but I sure can smell a cash cow!

            Liberal Party of Canada must run in 2015 on the…[Read more]

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    • Are you suggesting that we use the Eastern European model of alcohol?

      I was shocked when a bottle of Vodka was half the price of the same size bottle of coke.

      At the end of the day there is only one taxpayer. If alcohol taxes were dropped it would have to be collected by another means.

      My question is, if the tax revenue was transferred from…[Read more]

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      • No and no.

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        • OK David, forgive me if I am slow to understand your point.

          Are you suggesting that we use the Eastern European model of alcohol?
          => No

          If the tax revenue was transferred from alcohol to a sales tax. Will you view it as a new tax?
          => No

          New Question

          Will you view it as a new “tax” if profits collected by a illegitimate parallel government…[Read more]

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          • Yes.

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            • I must admit I am a little confused.

              Can you explain how we can move forward without following the Eastern European model of alcohol pricing?

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              • Which is what, John?

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                • No or very little taxation on alcohol. The prices could get so low that it could create health issues.

                  I do not want the general public to become less productive but I would like to see a reasonable approach that does not make criminals out of a large portion of the public if the laws were fully enforced.

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                  • If that logic holds true, would you say that Northern America’s artificially high alcohol prices were a contributing factor to the 2008 recession and is why people here are so very healthy and rarely abuse alcohol? Obviously not, however, whatever. I still think people learn and mature with or without government taxes telling them subliminally…[Read more]

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                    • I would argue if alcohol prices were greatly reduced we would have had a deeper recession.

                      Retailers have proven that if they slash prices, they sell more product.

                      I do not think it is a conscious decision on the part of the consumers. It is not only a question of maturity but also the effect of normal free market forces.

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                      • The question here has 2 main points, should we allow abuse of a substance if enough tax is collected, lotteries included. And 2, should one preference of enjoyment be used to tax more and thus make my hobby pay at a higher tax rate then someone who likes gardening, is the way I spend my after income tax dollar to be used unfairly or should we all…[Read more]

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                        • I think one line to draw is at what price does the black market have the advantage.

                          Secondly ”sin” taxes do disproportional effect the poor. Income tax and other tax rebates, I feel is the better place to balance the burden, not the prices at the retail level.

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    • Jeez, calm down John! It’s just a discussion of possible routes to take if we legalize. Do we regulate? Do we tax? If so, how much?

      If you actually bother to read my comment you will see (I’m sure) that nowhere have I proposed a price or a tax level.

      All I am saying is that people now are willing and able to pay far more than the actual cost…[Read more]

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      • I would like to see the price very close to currant prices

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      • This comment is aimed particularly at Martin and John Shavluk, not for reasons of favouritism, but because I have carefully followed this issue and have a pretty good understanding of where they stand and respect their various opinions.

        I am in agreement with a small “sin tax” for lack of a better word.

        I am wondering if we have considered…[Read more]

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        • Hi Lloyd, You’re mixing apples and oranges a bit here (or a better comparison might be “sweet” corn and “silo” corn).

          The plant Cannabis sativa has over 2000 varieties. Some are good for some things, some for others. The basic difference between “hemp” and “pot” is the level of TCH (Tetrahydrocannabinol ) which is the principal…[Read more]

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      • The way I see it times are changing,Marijuana will be legalized.I think Martin the ole time politicians,ole time thinking will be a thing of past tense.

        I think it’s time for those who cannot get up too speed with LPC modern campaigning should think of new venues in which too explore.

        Canada is in-need of new cash flow incentives & I see…[Read more]

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    • Although I know it will not happen, the government will see this as an opportunity to get more taxation, I think cannabis should be treated like any other vegetable, farmers will be taxed on the profits of their operations and individuals can grow it in their back yard like any other vegetable. It may be time for some leisure substances to be…[Read more]

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      • ”some leisure substances to be legal for us to produce without taxation, like home made wine”

        I could support this model for personal use but not for sale. I think that this is in line with currant alcohol laws.

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        • I guess you know that it is illegal to sell home produced eggs, cheese, and making a personal use law negates much of the benefit reducing the cost of chasing so called criminals.

          Then again I have not heard of anyone going to jail for selling eggs, and where I live as many eggs are sold by illegal producers as through the marketing board.
          If…[Read more]

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          • I am not suggesting consumers are criminals. This must change.

            I also never heard of an armed and violent struggle to control markets for eggs and cheese and potatoes in Canada. The marketing is vastly different to compare directly.

            Potatoes can be turned to vodka. Nothing wrong with that and you cannot sell the vodka. You can compare vodka to…[Read more]

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            • I do believe that it is illegal to produce hard liquor in Canada, but I could be wrong. And to me the only difference between potatoes and cannabis is with cannabis one could potentially drive while high and with potatoes not so much, although the derivatives from each is the problem not the plant itself. And I do not believe you can regulate…[Read more]

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              • I will openly admit that a tax on retail level does disportionately effect the lower income earners. I believe that tax rebates and other poverty reduction policies are a better way to address this issue.

                Potatoes is a food staple, cannabis is not. These two plants have less in common than they do in common.

                Having said that, I cannot imagine a…[Read more]

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                • It all comes down to, is cannabis a sin, does it cause health problems the rest of us have to pay for, and if so then it should be taxed to cover those costs, if not then it should not be taxed, my prefernces of hobbies should not be taxed more.

                  That said, all sin taxes should only be directed to the problmes they cause, and not be used as an…[Read more]

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                  • The way I look at this tax issue:

                    Organized crime is an illegitimate paralleled government. The hierarchy collects money to enforce compliance and rewards its leaders. They do not put anything into health care for the end user. They already have tested the market and established a price.

                    I see no need for an added federal tax. GST, Income tax…[Read more]

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    • It will have to be subject to regulation. Perhaps Liberals should recommend the creation of a Canadian Weed Board?

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    • There are plenty of difficult questions related to the legalization of marijuana.

      If it is decriminalized – which is what Liberals originally proposed nearly ten years ago – then it basically allows people to have small amounts. It would still be against the law – growers and dealers could be charged criminally – but people in possession would…[Read more]

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    • John, I really don’t want to get in argument with you but I do want to point out a few things in your last comment …

      As the discussion of taxes is in its early stages, I think it is too early to talk about “if it is ‘swamped’ by sin taxes” – all those of that support taxation are saying is that untaxed, it will be too cheap and that the…[Read more]

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    • Don’t be so quick to attack people, John. I think, if you read Mark’s comment carefully (please correct me if I’m wrong Mark) that he supports legalization, regulation and taxation.

      He happened to use the word “decriminalization”. You and I understand the “assumed” and very “subtle” difference between these words, but not everyone does.…[Read more]

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    • I agree John, decriminalization is just a word – so why attack someone for using it? Especially without explaining the difference between decriminalization and legalization? And now you’re are making up your own meaning …”individual is fined and the cannabis is taken away” – that is how some decriminalization works but certainly not all. This…[Read more]

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        1  
    • What is the point of all these comments John? Everyone here is in complete agreement that we need to change the current laws because they are unfair and lead to corruption.

      Who are you arguing with and about what?

      This thread started out as a discussion on whether or not legalized marijuana should be taxed.

      None of these comments about firemen…[Read more]

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        3  
    • Whatever John. All you have accomplished here is to commandeer yet another thread on cannabis and make it your own personal bully pulpit. We were have a perfectly reasonable discussion about taxation after legalization … and then along comes John with his rants and raves and insults.

      You might notice John that whenever you do this, the thread…[Read more]

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        4  
    • Hi John,
      I must agree with Martin on this one. The original discussion was all about the specific nitty-gritty details about decriminalization (I know you don’t like the word but you’ll have to deal with this because the truth is not all Canadian voters are as familiar with the difference as you are) AND regulation (sin tax, revenue generation,…[Read more]

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