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Just the Facts: Conservative and NDP platforms don’t add up

Just the Facts: Conservative and NDP platforms don’t add up

Posted on April 25, 2011
New revenue/spending by party platform (billions)

Year

NDP revenue NDP spending CPC revenue CPC spending LPC revenue LPC spending
2011-12 $12.63 $12.48 $0.00 $0.73 $4.19 $2.69
2012-13 $17.03 $16.99 $1.01 $1.64 $7.04 $5.54
Total: $29.66 $29.47 $1.01 $2.37 $11.23 $8.23

Conservative:

Stephen Harper’s platform makes families wait five years at the back of the line behind large corporations – and only if he can balance the budget with $11 billion in cutbacks after spending billions on jets, jails and corporate tax cuts.

Mr. Harper said he can find $11 billion in savings by consolidating the federal government’s computer system and reducing the federal public service.  But a report last week showed the computer consolidation would save as little as $40 million, and even a 5% reduction in the federal workforce through attrition would only produce about $1 billion in savings. (iPolitics, April 17, 2011)

Mr. Harper’s $11 billion in cuts will require a 10% reduction in program spending – which means government programs that Canadians rely on are at stake (Un projet de l’équipe de Stephen Harper – Des coupes douloureuses, Le Devoir, April 23, 2011). Stephen Harper still has yet to explain how he can avoid massive cuts to public health care to pay for his $30-billion F-35s, $13-billion U.S.-style mega-prisons and $6-billion corporate tax cuts.

NDP:

Jack Layton plans to spend nearly $30 billion in the next two years ($70 billion over the next four years) using fantasy money.

The NDP platform is based on $21.5 billion in revenues from a cap-and-trade system – including $3.6 billion this year – a hole that’s larger than the total planned Liberal spending this year.

On the weekend, Jack Layton said western states in the U.S. have already launched a cap-and-trade system that we can join immediately – but that’s not true.  The Western Climate Initiative’s draft framework won’t be implemented until at least 2015.

Mr. Layton plans to raise $8.6 billion over the next four years by cracking down on tax havens alone – but nowhere in the NDP platform does it explain how this can be done.

Unless Jack Layton can show Canadians where this money will come from, his $70-billion spending plans will be financed by increasing our already crippling deficit, or he’ll be forced to raise taxes on Canadian families.  The NDP plan is just not credible.

Liberal:

Liberals have laid out a credible two-year plan modeled after deficit-fighting Liberal budgets from the 1990s.  The Liberal platform that does not tie us to long-term spending commitments – like $6-billion annual corporate giveaways, $13-billion mega-prisons, or $30-billion stealth fighters – leaving space to secure the future of health care beyond 2014.

Only the Liberal Party’s platform offers a fully-costed, credible, realistic approach that puts families first, keeps taxes low and takes a responsible approach to the deficit.